Cadet Corps

The Police Cadet Corps is designed to prepare candidates for entrance into the Metropolitan Police Officer Recruit Program and ensures that a steady stream of District of Columbia youth are actively recruited as future police officers.  Cadets are 17-24 year-old uniformed civilian employee, working part time for the Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) while attending the University of the District of Columbia. The Department funds up to 60 college credits to enable District residents with a high school degree from a District high school or a GED to meet the college education requirement. 

Operating through a cooperative education model, MPD seeks to inspire District of Columbia residents between the ages of 17 and 24 who are attending or have graduated from a District of Columbia high school, or received their GED from the District of Columbia. Candidates will play a positive role in improving their neighborhoods. The underlying focus of cadet training is on self-discipline and instilling core values such as service to the community.

Cadets must earn up to sixty (60) college credits at the University of the District of Columbia Community College to satisfy MPD's police recruit entrance requirement. The program helps cadets develop the leadership and analytical thinking skills required to meet the challenges of their complex roles as problem-solvers, service providers, and professionals in the criminal justice system of the 21st century. Recruits will spend part of their time working specific job assignments to support the day-to-day operations of the MPD, perform rotating assignments among the districts and divisions, and gain familiarization with the daily operations of the Department.

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Selection Process

Upon acceptance, applicants must complete the items below in the following sequence:

1

Complete the initial job application online to receive a invitation to an upcoming orientation date within five to ten business days.

2

Attend a mandatory orientation.

3

Undergo a panel interview.

4

Receive permission from your parents or guardian to enter the Cadet Program if you are under the age of 18.

5

Undergo a background investigation (criminal checks, references, employment, social media checks, etc.).

7

Pass a medical examination, including a drug-screening test. Candidate must possess at least 20/100 vision, correctable to 20/30 in both eyes (contacts are permitted, but must be worn for six (6) months or Lasik-type surgery at least six (6) weeks prior to examination). Also must be of proportionate height and weight as measured by percentage of body fat.

8

Pass a psychological examination.

9

Pass an entrance examination by the University of the District of Columbia Community College in English and Math.

10

Receive MPD review and approval.

Benefits

  • Starting salary $31,820
  • Annual Leave
  • Paid Holidays
  • Retirement Benefits
  • Uniforms and Equipment (except belt & shoes)
  • Health Insurance
  • Sick Leave
  • College Tuition*
  • Conversion to Career Police status**

*Cadets must be full-time students at UDC and full-time civilian employees with MPD.

**Cadets convert to career police status upon completion of up to sixty college credits and acceptance into the Recruit Officer Training Program phase.

Visit the Benefits page to learn more.

QUALIFICATIONS

  • Be a US citizen by birth or naturalization at the time of application
  • Reside in the District of Columbia and agree to remain a resident until completion of the program
  • Be between 17 and 24 years of age
  • Have one of the following:
    • Be currently enrolled in a District of Columbia high school; OR
    • Graduate of a District of Columbia high school and received a diploma; OR
    • Recipient of a GED issued by the District of Columbia.

 

Contact Information

August 6, 1861, Congress passed an Act which declared the boundaries of DC to constitute...

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...a police district to be called the “Metropolitan Police District”. The newly elected President, Abraham Lincoln presided over the creation of this new police department. Washington, DC was divided into 10 precincts; each headed by a sergeant with 150 privates divided among the precincts. An officer’s salary was $480 a year and they had to be at least 5 feet 6 inches tall, able to read and write, between the age of 25 and 45, and were required to provide their own guns.

March, 1865 – MPD handled their first Presidential Inauguration...

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...MPD intercepted John Wilkes Booth during his first attempt to assassinate President Lincoln at the inauguration of Lincoln’s second term.

In 1890 women were officially hired as Matrons which handled female prisoners and children...

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...In 1917, the Women’s Bureau of the MPD was created in order to give women a more active role in investigating. The Bureau became nationally recognized for its proactive ideas and methods.

In 1913, the Department purchased the first motorized vehicles (10 motorcycles) to assist the...

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...bicycle squads and by 1914, five “motor patrol” wagons were purchased. In 1915, the first police school was established to train officers in using their firearms and basic first aid.

In 1934 the first Metropolitan Police Boys Club was established The club was designed to...

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...keep young men out of trouble and provide them with positive role models, and the club still exists today as the MPD Boys and Girls Clubs. The club was such a success that other cities quickly followed in the footsteps of the MPD.

In November 1948, the Metropolitan Police Reserve Corps was established and...

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...first deployed on October 31, 1951 with the original responsibility to guard fire alarm boxes to prevent people from mischievously sounding fire alarms on Halloween Night.

In 1951 the Chief, Robert V. Murray established an Internal Investigations...

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...Division during his tenure.

In 1962 Officers began to patrol and monitor traffic in a private helicopter.

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In 1966 the first cadet class graduated. 

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May 1-4, 1971, “May Day” when over 50,000 demonstrators came to Washington to...

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...force the closure of the Government. This was the largest mass arrest in history with a total of 12,000 people arrested. Due to the professionalism and effectiveness of the MPD, there were no serious injuries to police officers or protestors, no use of deadly force, and very few complaints of misconduct.

In 1978, Burtell M. Jefferson became the first African American Chief of Police....

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...He was a very community minded person, having been a native of Washington DC and having attended American University and Howard University. His tenure saw a reduction in crime while also dealing with restrictions due to the energy crisis and threats of personnel cuts.

In 1988, the Department switched from the long issued Smith and Wesson .38 caliber...

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...revolvers to the Glock 9mm pistols after Washington DC was named the Nation’s Murder Capital.

In 1993 the Office of Internal Affairs was created by Chief Fred Thomas to promote...

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...accountability among MPD officers.

In 1997, Chief Soulsby authorized the re-striping of the Scout Cars...

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...They were changed from the blue stripe and gold seal of the 1960s, to a red and blue striping that is still referred to as the Pepsi can design.

In 2004, the re-birth of the Air Support Unit (aka helicopter patrol, Helicopter Branch) was...

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...returned (original disbanded in 1996 due to budget cuts) along with a small cadre of horse-mounted officers.

In 2006, the joint Police and Fire Communications Center moved to a newly built state of...

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...the art communications center located on Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue in Southeast.

In Janury 2007, Chief Cathy Lanier was appointed by Washington, DC Mayor Adrian Fenty... 

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...in January 2007, replacing outgoing Police Chief Charles H. Ramsey. She was the first woman to achieve the position of Chief of Police in Washington DC.  In May 2012, Mayor Vincent C. Gray agreed to retain Lanier as police chief under his mayoral term.  Chief Lanier lead the Metropolitan Police Department until she retired 2017.  Chief Lanier was a great advocate for women in law enforcement and brought great technological changes to the MPD.  She was well known for her passionate involvement with the community.

In 2007-08, Chief Lanier initiated; patrol districts listserv; "Neighborhood...

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...Safety Zone” the replacement of in-car systems equipped with GPS.

On the morning of Monday, September 16, 2013, Aaron Alexis entered... 

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...Building 197 at the Washington Navy Yard, where he served as an independent contractor, and carried out the most deadly workplace mass shooting in the Nation’s Capital in recent memory.  Over the course of 69 minutes, Alexis terrorized thousands of employees of Naval Sea Systems Command, firing indiscriminately from a shotgun he had legally purchased two days earlier and a handgun he had taken from a security guard after mortally wounding the guard.  He would also get into multiple shooting engagements with responding law enforcement officers, seriously injuring a Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) officer.  In his final confrontation with police, Alexis ambushed and fired upon another MPD officer.  Fortunately, the officer was saved by his protective vest and was able to return fire, killing Alexis and ending his rampage.  When it was over, Alexis had shot and killed twelve people and injured several others.

Chief Peter Newsham was confirmed as the Chief of Police on May 3, 2017. 

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Chief Peter Newsham joined the MPD in 1989 and rose quickly through the ranks, serving in a number of district operational assignments. Chief Charles H. Ramsey promoted him to Commander of the Second District in January 2000. In June 2002, Newsham was promoted to Assistant Chief in charge of the Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR). Chief Newsham was sworn in as the 30th police chief for the MPD on May 3, 2017. Chief Newsham holds a bachelor's degree from the College of the Holy Cross and a law degree at the University of Maryland School of Law. He is a member of the Maryland Bar.

Questions? Comments?

300 Indiana Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20001 | P: (202) 645-0445 | F: (202) 645-0444 | [email protected]